James Selvakumar’s Blog

September 27, 2010

NetBeans and Maven – A quick start guide

Filed under: java,netbeans — James @ 1:56 pm
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A few months ago, I was reading the book “Wicket in Action”. I was new to Wicket and Maven then. I followed the instructions given in the book to create a maven project. The book went one step further and explained how to create eclipse and idea projects from the pom, but nothing was mentioned about NetBeans. I felt sad that there is no maven plugin out there to create projects that NetBeans can understand.

But later when I realized that there is no such need to create Netbeans projects from Maven pom, I was thrilled. Maven, is a first class citizen in NetBeans. Any Maven project “is a” NetBeans project.

Over the months, as I continued to learn and use Maven, NetBeans made the the learning curve easy. So I thought of putting up this post to benefit new Maven users.

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September 11, 2010

Book Review: NetBeans Platform 6.9 Developers Guide

Filed under: java,netbeans — James @ 5:19 am
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As I started reading a couple of chapters, I got impressed with the way the content is delivered.

The book starts with the traditional “Hello World” module and takes the reader to the advanced topics in an elegant and seamless manner. The author makes good use of screenshots which will help the beginners a lot.

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November 4, 2009

Developing A Simple Java Application With Spring

Filed under: java — James @ 1:23 pm
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Spring is a powerful application framework that can be used across any layer in your application. For example, you can use Spring to manage only your data access layer or you can use Spring to provide remote services for your swing client. In this article, I will explain how to get started with Spring by developing a simple java application.

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September 27, 2009

Developing a simple pluggable java application

Filed under: java,netbeans — James @ 1:56 pm
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Most of the applications we use on daily basis are pluggable. Popular applications like Firefox, Eclipse, NetBeans, JEdit, WordPress, Hudson are all pluggable. In fact, pluggability has played a major part in the success of most of these applications. Why not make the Java applications we develop pluggable as well? Yes, we get pluggability out of the box, if our applications are based on a rich client platform like NetBeans or Eclipse. But for some reasons if you decide not to use those platforms, it doesn’t mean that they should not be pluggable. In this article, we will learn how to write a simple pluggable application that will load it’s plugins dynamically.

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September 19, 2009

NautilusSVN – The TortoiseSVN for Linux users

Filed under: subversion,version control — James @ 2:42 pm
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TortoiseSVN is the dominant Subversion client for Windows. While there so many Subversion clients available, what makes TortoiseSVN special is it’s smooth integration with the Windows Explorer. As a result, working with your Subversion repository becomes super easy. When I switched completely from Windows to Ubuntu Linux, TortoiseSVN is one of the few applications I missed. Not anymore!

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August 26, 2009

What UML Tools do you use?

Filed under: eclipse,general,netbeans — James @ 3:48 pm
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Poll: What UML Tools do you use?

Most popular Subversion clients

Subversion is a very popular version control system. As a result, subversion has a wide array of client tools which makes life difficult for us, the users. So we wanted to know what our readers actually use and here is the summary of their opinions. Read more from SolitaryGeek.

Five different uses of Java Applets

Filed under: java — James @ 3:40 pm
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In a world where everyone is using technologies like Flash, Silverlight etc to present rich content, are Java Applets still used? Are they still relevant? The answer is – “Yes”. Apart from being used primarily for playing online games, Java Applets are still used in many different ways. Read more from SolitaryGeek.

August 17, 2009

Subversion and RapidSVN

Subversion is a very popular version control system. Though Subversion provides a very robust command line client, most of us prefer using a nice GUI front end. Windows users are really fortunate to have a powerful tool like TortoiseSVN which without any argument is simply the best front end for Subversion. Unfortunately, TortoiseSVN is available for just the Windows platform. Here I would like to highlight about RapidSVN, a cross-platform GUI front end for Subversion.

Learn more about RapidSVN from SolitaryGeek.

July 28, 2009

Hudson CI Server – A quick start guide

Filed under: java,netbeans — James @ 4:43 pm
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Learn how to setup Hudson Continuous Integration server to automate your build process from this solitarygeek.com post.

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